Mohawk Valley Trading Company Maple Syrup T-Shirt Giveaway 1/29/13 thru 02/05/13

The Mohawk Valley Trading Company is giving away one Maple Syrup T-Shirt with each order of their 32 oz. glass bottle of maple syrup from 1/29/13 thru 02/05/13. This promotion is sponsored by custom t-shirt printer Crooked Brook as part of their continuing effort to support and promote sustainable agriculture, local, small and family owned farms and other local food sources.

 

Utica, NY — The Mohawk Valley Trading Company is giving away one Maple Syrup T-Shirt with each order of their 32 oz. glass bottle of maple syrup from 1/29/13 thru 02/05/13. In their effort to support and promote sustainable agriculture, local, small and family owned farms and other local food sources, custom t-shirt printer Crooked Brook is sponsoring this promotion.

The t-shirt is a Gildan, G200 6.1 oz. Ultra Cotton® T-Shirt made in 100% preshrunk cotton with the image of The Mohawk Valley Trading Company Maple Syrup label and URL printed on the back.

Although the most popular method of printing t-shirts is screen printing, Crooked Brook t-shirts are printed using Direct To Garment Printing (DTG) which is the process of using inkjet printers to print an image directly onto t-shirts without the use of screens like with screen printing, which requires a lot of setup e.g., creating screens for each color. In addition, DTG printing uses eco-friendly, water soluble ink, unlike some screen printing methods that layer Plastisol (a suspension of PVC particles in a plasticizer) on top of the t-shirt. The only requirement for DTG printing is for the image to be high resolution, resulting in photograph quality printing with no setup fee or minimums for custom t-shirts.

About Maple Syrup

The production of maple syrup in North America predates European colonization. Early Native American societies in Canada and the northeastern United States were distilling maple syrup and sugar before those geographic boundaries existed. Maple sugar is made from the controlled crystallization of maple syrup and takes several forms.There is no written record of the first syrup production but several native legends persist. Many tribes celebrated the short maple sap collection season with specific rituals.

The Native Americans collected maple sap from v-shaped notches carved into maple trees. The sap was diverted into birch bark buckets using bark or reeds. It was concentrated by placing hot stones into the buckets or by freezing the sap and removing the ice, which is composed only of water.

Sugar maple sap is preferred for maple syrup production because it has an average sugar content of two percent. Sap from other maple species is usually lower in sugar content, and about twice as much is needed to produce the same amount of finished syrup.

When Europeans reached northeastern America they adapted native techniques to make their own maple syrup. The v-shaped notches were replaced with auger-drilled holes. This practice is less damaging to the trees. Bark buckets were replaced with seamless wooden buckets carved from lumber rounds. The method of sap concentration also changed from passive to active. Large amounts of sap were collected and brought to a single area where it was boiled over fires in round cauldrons until reduced to the desired consistency. ‘Sugar shacks’ were built expressly for the purpose of sap boiling. Draft animals were often used to haul fire wood and large containers of sap for sugaring. Maple syrup was an important food additive in early America because imported cane sugar was not yet available.

In the mid-1800’s syrup production changed again. Round cauldrons were replaced by flat pans in order to increase surface area and therefore allow for faster evaporation. Over the next 60 year several variations on this design were patented. Draft animals were replaced by tractors and heating methods expanded to include propane, oil and natural gas as well as wood.

The 1970’s represent another period of major changes in maple syrup production. Plastic tubing running directly from trees to the sugaring location eliminated the need for energy and time intensive sap collection. Reverse osmosis and pre-heating made syrup production more efficient. Recent advances have been made in sugarbush (maple trees used primarily for syrup production) management, filtration and storage.

There are two well known systems of maple syrup grading in use today. One system is used in Canada (where 80% of the world’s maple syrup is produced) and another system is used in the United States of America. Both systems are based on color and translucence with relate to the flavor of the syrup. Different grades are produced by the same trees over the length of the season.

Since maple syrup recipes usually do not specify any particular grade to use, take into consideration that darker colored syrups will produce dishes that a have a pronounced maple flavor.

The Mohawk Valley Trading Company hours of operations are 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. EST, seven days a week. Reach them at (315)-519-2640 to learn more.

For the original version visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/maple-syrup/custom-t-shirts/prweb10376815.htm

Early Maple Syrup Season for 2013 on Hold as Deep Freeze Lingers

Kaukauna, Wisconsin — Last week, unseasonably warm weather in some parts of the country led to some maple syrup producers to start tapping their maple trees which usually does not happen until the middle of February. However, the recent Arctic blast that has gripped a third of the nation has some of them wondering if they have “jumped the gun”.

When asked about this, Angela K. Murphy Schumacher of Smoky Lake Maple Products, a small maple syrup producer and maple syrup equipment fabricator located in Northeastern Wisconsin said “It is hard to say. We have had a few customers tell us they have already started tapping and others are waiting for the usual time. It’s like this every year though.”

“Maple producers are very passionate about their work and are eager to get started. Nobody wants to miss out on a good sap run.” Schumacher continued. “Unfortunately, tapping to early can be a problem because the tap hole could have started to heal closed by the time peak flow really comes. “

“I have not heard of anybody that I know in upstate NY tapping before the cold snap” said Mary Ross of the Mohawk Valley Trading Company of Utica, NY where their maple syrup is made primarily from sugar maple sap. “If all goes well, were looking at about a couple of weeks before we start.”

Officials believe that the sub-zero temperatures have been responsible for four deaths to date and at least two fires in southern Wisconsin.

About Smoky Lake Maple Products

Smoky Lake Maple Products is a small maple syrup producer and maple syrup equipment fabricator located in Northeastern Wisconsin. Quality is at the forefront of all they do, and they stand proud behind the craftsmanship of each and every Smoky Lake product.

In addition to maple syrup, they offer a full line of very high quality maple syrup equipment, from bag collection frames to bottlers and evaporation pans. Smoky Lake Maple Products stays on top of industry technology so that they can incorporate new features in their products that will save their customers time and money. By keeping maple syrup production fun and affordable for both hobbyists and commercial producers alike, they are able to share their passion for maple syrup.

About Maple Syrup

The production of maple syrup in North America predates European colonization. Early Native American societies in Canada and the northeastern United States were distilling maple syrup and sugar before those geographic boundaries existed. Maple sugar is made from the controlled crystallization of maple syrup and takes several forms.There is no written record of the first syrup production but several native legends persist. Many tribes celebrated the short maple sap collection season with specific rituals.

The Native Americans collected maple sap from v-shaped notches carved into maple trees. The sap was diverted into birch bark buckets using bark or reeds. It was concentrated by placing hot stones into the buckets or by freezing the sap and removing the ice, which is composed only of water.

Sugar maple sap is preferred for maple syrup production because it has an average sugar content of two percent. Sap from other maple species is usually lower in sugar content, and about twice as much is needed to produce the same amount of finished syrup.

When Europeans reached northeastern America they adapted native techniques to make their own maple syrup. The v-shaped notches were replaced with auger-drilled holes. This practice is less damaging to the trees. Bark buckets were replaced with seamless wooden buckets carved from lumber rounds. The method of sap concentration also changed from passive to active. Large amounts of sap were collected and brought to a single area where it was boiled over fires in round cauldrons until reduced to the desired consistency. ‘Sugar shacks’ were built expressly for the purpose of sap boiling. Draft animals were often used to haul fire wood and large containers of sap for sugaring. Maple syrup was an important food additive in early America because imported cane sugar was not yet available.

In the mid-1800’s syrup production changed again. Round cauldrons were replaced by flat pans in order to increase surface area and therefore allow for faster evaporation. Over the next 60 year several variations on this design were patented. Draft animals were replaced by tractors and heating methods expanded to include propane, oil and natural gas as well as wood.

The 1970’s represent another period of major changes in maple syrup production. Plastic tubing running directly from trees to the sugaring location eliminated the need for energy and time intensive sap collection. Reverse osmosis and pre-heating made syrup production more efficient. Recent advances have been made in sugarbush (maple trees used primarily for syrup production) management, filtration and storage.

For the original version visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/wisconsin/maple-syrup/prweb10366788.htm

Obama’s Presidential Inaugural Luncheon to Serve Honey from New York State

Washington, DC — President Obama’s Inaugural Luncheon will serve Seaway Trail Honey from Rochester, NY along with dessert.

“My grandfather kept bees so beekeeping has been accepted in my family as a vocation or as a hobby,” said beekeeper and owner of Seaway Trail Honey Pat Bono, who has been in the honey business for about 35 years.”I do try to maintain a really quality product. The honey is good. I have to admit it.”

Seaway Trail Honey is a one of a number of New York State products chosen by Senator Chuck Schumer, chairman of the inaugural ceremonies, to be served during inaugural festivities, including the New York State Inaugural Ball Saturday night.

“We are extremely happy for Pat Bono.” said Mary Ross of the Mohawk Valley Trading Company where they specialize in raw honey. “This exposure is a good for all New York State honey producers.”

“For the dessert course there will be a plate and it will have an apple tart with ice cream on top and then there will be cheese wedges, and actually a cube of honeycomb with honey drizzled on it,” Bono continued “It’s a big deal. To me it’s like a chance in a lifetime to have the President, all these top people in the United State of America, eating the honeycomb that was produced here up in the Rochester area.”

Business has increased since news of her honey spread said Bono.

“It still hasn’t sunk in yet of how great this is,” she said. “I would like to get a program going to promote New York honey, there’s a lot of good honey out there.”

“Now, if Senator Chuck Schumer had included some New York State maple syrup,” said Ross “that would have been sweet.”

About Honey
Honey has been used by humans since ancient times for its health benefits and as a sweetener and flavoring for many foods and beverages with tea being the most popular. Honey bees make honey by collecting nectar from flowers and regurgitating it to store in beeswax honeycombs inside their hive. Beeswax is a natural wax produced in the bee hive of honey bees of the genus Apis and one it’s most popular uses is beeswax candles.

The flavor and color of honey is determined by the type of flower the bees gather the nectar from. Dark colored honey is considered to be higher in minerals and antioxidants than light colored honey and one of the most well known dark colored honeys is buckwheat honey. Raw buckwheat honey contains a higher amount of minerals and an antioxidant called polyphenol, which gives it its dark color.

Buckwheat was an important crop in the U.S. until the demand declined in the 1960’s. Buckwheat honey is not a widespread honey and finding it locally may be difficult because today, buckwheat is primarily grown in the northern states.

Buckwheat seeds are also used or making gluten free flour and buckwheat blossoms are an excellent source of nectar and blooming can continue well into the autumn.

Buckwheat hulls are used as filling for pillows and meditation cushions. The hulls are durable and do not conduct or reflect heat as much as synthetic fills and they are an excellent substitute to feathers for people with allergies. However, buckwheat hull pillows made with uncleaned and unprocessed hulls contain high levels of allergens that may trigger an asthma attack in those who are at risk.

Honey is a healthy alternative to refined sugar, however when cooking or baking with honey, it is not necessary to use raw honey since the heat destroys the all of the pollen, enzymes, propolis, vitamins, amino acids, antioxidants, minerals, and aromatics. Since the flavor and color of honey is determined by the type of flower the bees gather the nectar from, it is a good idea to taste the honey before using it in a recipe. For example; a dark honey like buckwheat honey will result in a strong, heavy, a pungent flavor, whereas orange blossom honey will result in a delicate orange flavor.

Organic honey from the United States is a myth because the country is too developed and uses too many agricultural and industrial chemicals to for the production of organic honey. Honey bees are free-roaming, wild creatures and it is impossible guarantee that while foraging they have not come in contact with prohibited substances, like pesticides.

To get the best price when buying large quantities of honey, look for a company that sells bulk honey which is usually sold in 5 lb., 12 lb. and 60 lb. pails or 650 lb drums.

The Mohawk Valley Trading Company hours of operations are 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. EST, seven days a week. Reach them at (315)-519-2640 to learn more.

For the original version visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/honey/presidential-inauguration/prweb10345218.htm

 

Mohawk Valley Trading Company to Attend Maple Syrup Class at Gouverneur High Jan. 26

Utica, NY — The growing demand for maple syrup continues as more health conscious consumers look for natural sweeteners as an alternative to refined sugar, according to the Mohawk Valley Trading Company.

In response to this, the Cornell Cooperative Extension of St. Lawrence County, St. Lawrence Maple Producers, and Gouverneur FFA will be hosting a class on Saturday, January 26th at Gouverneur High School for those who are interested in learning how to make maple syrup as a hobby or a business.

Representatives from the Mohawk Valley Trading Company plan to attend. “Maple sugaring season will be here soon and we are looking forward to this event and others like it,” said Mary Ross of the Mohawk Valley Trading Company where their maple syrup is made primarily from sugar maple sap.

The daylong class that begins at 8:30 a.m. will include lunch and is $15 for adults, $5 for children. There will be workshops for adults, children and families that are designed for both the novice and professional producers. Discussions will cover maple royalty, pricing and marketing maple products, GPS woodlot management, backyard beginner sugar making, value-added maple products. Please call 315-379-9192 for more information.

Richard Gast, Cornell Cooperative Extension Franklin County Horticulture and Natural Resources Educator said “The Northern New York maple schools represent an exceptional opportunity to learn, or learn more, about maple production from trees to table and about the sustainable forestry practices that make maple production possible.”

About Maple Syrup

The production of maple syrup in North America predates European colonization. Early Native American societies in Canada and the northeastern United States were distilling maple syrup and sugar before those geographic boundaries existed. There is no written record of the first syrup production but several native legends persist. Many tribes celebrated the short maple sap collection season with specific rituals.

The Native Americans collected maple sap from v-shaped notches carved into maple trees. The sap was diverted into birch bark buckets using bark or reeds. It was concentrated by placing hot stones into the buckets or by freezing the sap and removing the ice, which is composed only of water.

Sugar maple sap is preferred for maple syrup production because it has an average sugar content of two percent. Sap from other maple species is usually lower in sugar content, and about twice as much is needed to produce the same amount of finished syrup.

When Europeans reached northeastern America they adapted native techniques to make their own maple syrup. The v-shaped notches were replaced with auger-drilled holes. This practice is less damaging to the trees. Bark buckets were replaced with seamless wooden buckets carved from lumber rounds. The method of sap concentration also changed from passive to active. Large amounts of sap were collected and brought to a single area where it was boiled over fires in round cauldrons until reduced to the desired consistency. ‘Sugar shacks’ were built expressly for the purpose of sap boiling. Draft animals were often used to haul fire wood and large containers of sap for sugaring. Maple syrup was an important food additive in early America because imported cane sugar was not yet available.

In the mid-1800’s syrup production changed again. Round cauldrons were replaced by flat pans in order to increase surface area and therefore allow for faster evaporation. Over the next 60 year several variations on this design were patented. Draft animals were replaced by tractors and heating methods expanded to include propane, oil and natural gas as well as wood.

The 1970’s represent another period of major changes in maple syrup production. Plastic tubing running directly from trees to the sugaring location eliminated the need for energy and time intensive sap collection. Reverse osmosis and pre-heating made syrup production more efficient. Recent advances have been made in sugarbush (maple trees used primarily for syrup production) management, filtration and storage.

There are two well known systems of maple syrup grading in use today. One system is used in Canada (where 80% of the world’s maple syrup is produced) and another system is used in the United States of America. Both systems are based on color and translucence with relate to the flavor of the syrup. Different grades are produced by the same trees over the length of the season.

Since maple syrup recipes usually do not specify any particular grade to use, take into consideration that darker colored syrups will produce dishes that a have a pronounced maple flavor.

The Mohawk Valley Trading Company hours of operations are 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. EST, seven days a week. Reach them at (315)-519-2640 to learn more.

For the original version visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/maple-syrup/education/prweb10342998.htm

Global Warming Threatens Maple Syrup Production: 2012 Ninth-Warmest Year Since 1880

Utica, NY — Scientists at the University of Vermont and others think global warming may be having some effect on maple syrup production in the United States by decreasing the season and shifting it to the north. The production of maple syrup requires specific climate conditions of cold nights and warm days and as sugar-maple forests shift north; this could benefit Canada’s maple industry which produces more than 80 percent of the world’s supply.

“I don’t care what the naysayers say,” said Mary Ross of the Mohawk Valley Trading Company where their maple syrup is made primarily from sugar maple sap. “There is a growing body of evidence that the earth’s ambient temperature is rising. Scientists at NASA have ranked 2012 as the ninth-warmest year since 1880, when they started recording yearly temperatures and the ten hottest years over this 132-year time span have all happened since 1998.”

Timothy D. Perkins, Ph.D., director of the University of Vermont’s Proctor Maple Research Center, testified before Congress in 2007, that maple syrup season starts approximately 8 days earlier than it did 40 years ago and ends approximately 11 days earlier.

In addition, unusually warm summers and drought also contribute to the down turn in maple syrup production. The U.S. Global Change Research Program reported that temperatures in maple-sugar production regions of New England have steadily increased since 1916, a forbidding dilemma since sugar maples cannot thrive if summer temperatures are consistently above 77°F.

Professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at Cornell University, Brian F. Chabot, Ph.D., said that over the next 100 years, maple-syrup production in the United States will start earlier and earlier.

About The Proctor Maple Research Center

The Proctor Maple Research Center is a Field Research Station of the Department of Plant Biology in the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences at the University of Vermont.

The Proctor Maple Research Center was established in 1946 with the donation of the former Harvey Farm in Underhill Center, Vermont, to the University of Vermont by Governor Mortimer Proctor. Research has centered on the sugar maple tree (Acer saccharum Marsh.) and its products–sap and syrup.

About Maple Syrup

The production of maple syrup (メープルシロップ) in North America predates European colonization. Early Native American societies in Canada and the northeastern United States were distilling maple syrup and sugar before those geographic boundaries existed. There is no written record of the first syrup production but several native legends persist. Many tribes celebrated the short maple sap collection season with specific rituals.

The Native Americans collected maple sap from v-shaped notches carved into maple trees. The sap was diverted into birch bark buckets using bark or reeds. It was concentrated by placing hot stones into the buckets or by freezing the sap and removing the ice, which is composed only of water.

Sugar maple sap is preferred for maple syrup production because it has an average sugar content of two percent. Sap from other maple species is usually lower in sugar content, and about twice as much is needed to produce the same amount of finished syrup.

When Europeans reached northeastern America they adapted native techniques to make their own maple syrup. The v-shaped notches were replaced with auger-drilled holes. This practice is less damaging to the trees. Bark buckets were replaced with seamless wooden buckets carved from lumber rounds. The method of sap concentration also changed from passive to active. Large amounts of sap were collected and brought to a single area where it was boiled over fires in round cauldrons until reduced to the desired consistency. ‘Sugar shacks’ were built expressly for the purpose of sap boiling. Draft animals were often used to haul fire wood and large containers of sap for sugaring. Maple syrup was an important food additive in early America because imported cane sugar was not yet available.

In the mid-1800’s syrup production changed again. Round cauldrons were replaced by flat pans in order to increase surface area and therefore allow for faster evaporation. Over the next 60 year several variations on this design were patented. Draft animals were replaced by tractors and heating methods expanded to include propane, oil and natural gas as well as wood.

The 1970’s represent another period of major changes in maple syrup production. Plastic tubing running directly from trees to the sugaring location eliminated the need for energy and time intensive sap collection. Reverse osmosis and pre-heating made syrup production more efficient. Recent advances have been made in sugarbush (maple trees used primarily for syrup production) management, filtration and storage.

There are two well known systems of maple syrup grading in use today. One system is used in Canada (where 80% of the world’s maple syrup is produced) and another system is used in the United States of America. Both systems are based on color and translucence with relate to the flavor of the syrup. Different grades are produced by the same trees over the length of the season.

Since maple syrup recipes usually do not specify any particular grade to use, take into consideration that darker colored syrups will produce dishes that a have a pronounced maple flavor.

The Mohawk Valley Trading Company hours of operations are 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. EST, seven days a week. Reach them at (315)-519-2640 to learn more.
For the original version visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/maple-syrup/global-warming/prweb10340954.htm

Maple Syrup Diet: Weight Loss Favorite in 2006, Popular Again in 2013

Utica , NY — “Lose Weight” is the #1 New Year’s resolution and The Maple Syrup Diet made famous by Beyoncé Knowles who used the diet to lose 20 pounds for her role in the movie Dreamgirls in 2006, is gaining popularity again according to Mary Ross of the Mohawk Valley Trading Company. Made primarily from sugar maple sap, Mohawk Valley Trading Company maple syrup is used and recommended by one of by the world’s most recognized chefs; Bobby Flay.

“Many of our customers who made a New Year’s resolution to lose weight, said they plan to use The Maple Syrup Diet.” said Ross. “It is also referred to as Beyonce’s Maple Syrup Diet; she made it popular in 2006 when she used The Maple Syrup Diet to lose 20 pounds for her role in the movie Dreamgirls.”

The Maple Syrup Diet, also known as the Golden Syrup Diet, Lemonade Diet or the Master Cleanse was developed by the late naturopath Stanley Burroughs in the 1970’s as a fasting and detoxification program. It has been used by other celebrities such as Naomi Campbell, Ashton Kutcher, Jared Leto, Demi Moore and Gwyenth Paltrow.

“Many people are two weeks into their 2013 New Year’s resolution to lose weight and Beyoncé is making headlines because she is scheduled to sing the national anthem at President Obama’s Inauguration Jan. 21 and to perform during the Super Bowl halftime Feb. 3 with her old group, Destiny’s Child. No doubt, some people remember her success with the Maple Syrup Diet.” Ross continued.

About Maple Syrup

The production of maple syrup in North America predates European colonization. Early Native American societies in Canada and the northeastern United States were distilling maple syrup and sugar before those geographic boundaries existed. There is no written record of the first syrup production but several native legends persist. Many tribes celebrated the short maple sap collection season with specific rituals.

The Native Americans collected maple sap from v-shaped notches carved into maple trees. The sap was diverted into birch bark buckets using bark or reeds. It was concentrated by placing hot stones into the buckets or by freezing the sap and removing the ice, which is composed only of water.

Sugar maple sap is preferred for maple syrup production because it has an average sugar content of two percent. Sap from other maple species is usually lower in sugar content, and about twice as much is needed to produce the same amount of finished syrup.

When Europeans reached northeastern America they adapted native techniques to make their own maple syrup. The v-shaped notches were replaced with auger-drilled holes. This practice is less damaging to the trees. Bark buckets were replaced with seamless wooden buckets carved from lumber rounds. The method of sap concentration also changed from passive to active. Large amounts of sap were collected and brought to a single area where it was boiled over fires in round cauldrons until reduced to the desired consistency. ‘Sugar shacks’ were built expressly for the purpose of sap boiling. Draft animals were often used to haul fire wood and large containers of sap for sugaring. Maple syrup was an important food additive in early America because imported cane sugar was not yet available.

In the mid-1800’s syrup production changed again. Round cauldrons were replaced by flat pans in order to increase surface area and therefore allow for faster evaporation. Over the next 60 year several variations on this design were patented. Draft animals were replaced by tractors and heating methods expanded to include propane, oil and natural gas as well as wood.

The 1970’s represent another period of major changes in maple syrup production. Plastic tubing running directly from trees to the sugaring location eliminated the need for energy and time intensive sap collection. Reverse osmosis and pre-heating made syrup production more efficient. Recent advances have been made in sugarbush (maple trees used primarily for syrup production) management, filtration and storage.

There are two well known systems of maple syrup grading in use today. One system is used in Canada (where 80% of the world’s maple syrup is produced) and another system is used in the United States of America. Both systems are based on color and translucence with relate to the flavor of the syrup. Different grades are produced by the same trees over the length of the season.

Since maple syrup recipes usually do not specify any particular grade to use, take into consideration that darker colored syrups will produce dishes that a have a pronounced maple flavor.

The Mohawk Valley Trading Company hours of operations are 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. EST, seven days a week. Reach them at (315)-519-2640 to learn more.

For the original version visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/maple-syrup/beyonce-diet/prweb10319538.htm