Maple Syrup T-Shirt Giveaway 1 by the Mohawk Valley Trading Company, Sponsored by Crooked Brook

New York, NY — The Mohawk Valley Trading Company is holding Maple Syrup T-Shirt Giveaway 1 on their LocalHarvest blog. The giveaway is sponsored by Crooked Brook and ends midnight (Eastern Standard Time) 05/31/12.

This prize is a white, Gildan, G200 6.1 oz. Ultra Cotton® T-Shirt made in 100% preshrunk cotton, taped shoulder-to-shoulder with a seamless collar and double-needle stitching throughout and the image of the Mohawk Valley Trading Company maple syrup label and URL printed on the back.

Although the most popular method of printing t-shirts is screen printing, Crooked Brook t-shirts are printed using Direct to Garment Printing (digital garment printing or DTG) which is the process of using inkjet printers to print an image directly onto t-shirts without the use of screens like with screen printing, which requires a lot of setup e.g., creating screens for each color. In addition, DTG printing uses eco-friendly, water soluble ink, unlike some screen printing methods that layer Plastisol (a suspension of PVC particles in a plasticizer) on top of the t-shirt. The only requirement for DTG printing is for the image to be high resolution, resulting in photograph quality printing with no setup fee or minimums for custom t-shirts.

The winner will be chosen randomly, from those who post a comment on the Mohawk Valley Trading Company LocalHarvest blog with an answer to this question; How do you like to use maple syrup?

Terms & Conditions:

You must be 18 years or older to win.
Contest ends midnight (Eastern Standard Time) 05/24/12.
Winner will be chosen randomly and contacted by email.
Winner will have 48 hours to reply or a new winner will be chosen.
Crooked Brook will ship the prize to the winner within 30 days of contest end.
Physical address required for shipping; no PO boxes, US recipients only residing in one of the 48 contiguous states.

About Mohawk Valley Trading Company Maple Syrup

The Mohawk Valley Trading Company (MVTC) offers the highest quality organic and unprocessed natural products they can produce. Their raw honey and maple syrup is used and endorsed by two of by the world’s most recognized chefs: Bobby Flay recommends the maple syrup and Tom Colicchio recommends the honey. Not only does Tom say their honey is one of his “Personal Pantry Essentials” and “Favorite Gifts” but he also keeps “a jar of the stuff on my desk at all times.”

Their maple syrup is made primarily from sugar maple sap. Sugar maple sap is preferred for maple syrup production because it has an average sugar content of two percent. Sap from other maple species is usually lower in sugar content, and about twice as much is needed to produce the same amount of finished syrup.

About Crooked Brook

Crooked Brook is a unit of the atelier division of an art studio that offers full service apparel design, pattern making, sample making, private-label small lot production and embroidery. Since 1989, they’ve built a strong reputation of providing top-notch apparel designs, patterns, fit and production samples for many brand name catalogs and retailers, as well as wardrobe and costumes for movies, television and theater.

All Crooked Brook branded garments and accessories are proudly made to order in the U.S.A.

Because of their unparalleled attention to detail in tailoring, they were awarded a Supima® licensing agreement. These contracts are not awarded lightly. The applicants must meet requirements insuring the highest level of quality and integrity for any products bearing the Supima® brand.

In addition, Crooked Brook designs and manufactures:

Men’s and women’s chef coats and uniforms for the world’s most recognized chefs, hotels, casinos, spas and resorts as well as alumni chef jackets for the Culinary Institute of America. Each garment can be personalized with the customer’s choice of fabric, pockets, buttons, piping and embroidery. With a design studio in New York City, (the fashion and gastronomic capital of the world) and a production facility in Utica, New York, they’ve garnered international brand name recognition as the maker of the “World’s Highest Quality Chef Jackets™”.

Promotional products, items, decorated apparel and accessories, such as; jackets, hats, sweatshirts, hoodies, polo shirts, fleece blankets, sweatshirt blankets, button down shirts, fleece jackets, golf shirts, custom t-shirts, tote bags, and aprons that can be customized with the following apparel decorating methods:

Embroidery
Tackle Twill
Appliqué
Direct to Garment Printing (DTG)
Sublimation

Custom lab coats, uniforms and scrubs for nursing, medical, dental, scientific, engineering, technology & healthcare professionals.

Custom made apparel and accessories for men and women, including but not limited to: suits, shirts, Hawaiian shirts, pants, vests, dresses, skirts, gowns, jeans, boxer shorts, martial arts and yoga outfits.

Crooked Brook ships worldwide. Hours of operations are 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. EST, seven days a week. Reach them at (315) 733-1992 to learn more.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/t-shirts/custom/prweb9543251.htm

The Hibbert Maple Syrup Festival Returns – Dublin, Perth County, Ontario

Ontario, Canada — The Hibbert Maple Syrup Festival will take place from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, March 30 at the Hibbert work shed on Perth Line 180, Dublin, Perth County, Ontario.

In their effort to support and promote sustainable agriculture, local, small and family owned farms and other local food sources, The Mohawk Valley Trading Company encourages families and people of all ages to attend and participate in maple festivities.

“Maple syrup festivities are fun, historical and educational outdoor events that are always a good time for families and people of all ages,” said Mary Ross of the Mohawk Valley Trading Company where their maple syrup is made primarily from sugar maple sap.

Sugar maple sap is preferred for maple syrup production because it has an average sugar content of two percent. Sap from other maple species is usually lower in sugar content, and about twice as much is needed to produce the same amount of finished syrup.

“Maple syrup and sugar have played an important role in our nation’s history.” Ross continued, “After the passage of the 1764 Sugar Act, which imposed high tariffs on imported sugar, maple sugar became even more popular. Before he became president, Thomas Jefferson liked the idea that maple sugar could be produced by citizens of the new nation and sever it’s dependence on sugar grown on plantations in the British Caribbean. And at the end of a visit to Vermont, in a speech he gave in Bennington, Jefferson said, “Attention to our sugar orchards is essentially necessary to secure the independence of our country.”

For those who would like to attend, pancakes will be offered at the Hibbert work shed and a horse-drawn wagon trip into the Roney Maple Sugar Bush on Perth Line 180 will be available.

According to Merv Shewan, chairman of the Maple Syrup Festival, about 700 people attended the event last year which was a little lower than in previous years. “I think we’ll get the numbers up again this year,” said Shewan. “The word of mouth should be going around in a positive manner this time.”

“All help is welcome and appreciated,” said Shewan.

Call 519-345-2701 for more information.

About Maple Syrup

Next to honey, maple syrup is the most popular natural sweetener in North America and its production predates European colonization. Early Native American societies in Canada and the northeastern United States were distilling maple tree sap making maple syrup and sugar before those geographic boundaries existed. Maple sugar is made from the controlled crystallization of maple syrup and takes several forms.There is no written record of the first syrup production but several native legends persist. Many tribes celebrated the short maple sap collection season with specific rituals.

The Native Americans collected maple sap from v-shaped notches carved into maple trees. The sap was diverted into birch bark buckets using bark or reeds. It was concentrated by placing hot stones into the buckets or by freezing the sap and removing the ice, which is composed only of water.

When Europeans reached northeastern America they adapted native techniques to make their own maple syrup. The v-shaped notches were replaced with auger-drilled holes. This practice is less damaging to the trees. Bark buckets were replaced with seamless wooden buckets carved from lumber rounds. The method of sap concentration also changed from passive to active. Large amounts of sap were collected and brought to a single area where it was boiled over fires in round cauldrons until reduced to the desired consistency. ‘Sugar shacks’ were built expressly for the purpose of sap boiling. Draft animals were often used to haul fire wood and large containers of sap for sugaring. Maple syrup was an important food additive in early America because imported cane sugar was not yet available.

In the mid-1800’s syrup production changed again. Round cauldrons were replaced by flat pans in order to increase surface area and therefore allow for faster evaporation. Over the next 60 year several variations on this design were patented. Draft animals were replaced by tractors and heating methods expanded to include propane, oil and natural gas as well as wood.

The 1970’s represent another period of major changes in maple syrup production. Plastic tubing running directly from trees to the sugaring location eliminated the need for energy and time intensive sap collection. Reverse osmosis and pre-heating made syrup production more efficient. Recent advances have been made in sugarbush (maple trees used primarily for syrup production) management, filtration and storage.

French toast, waffles, pancakes or oatmeal are regularly served with maple syrup and it is used as a sweetener or flavoring ingredient in baked goods and ice cream. Since maple syrup recipes usually do not specify any particular grade to use, take into consideration that darker colored syrups will produce dishes that a have a pronounced maple flavor.

The Mohawk Valley Trading Company offers the highest quality unprocessed natural products they can produce namely; maple syrup, raw honey, beeswax candles, natural skin care products and handmade soap. In addition, they offer natural stone, tea and spices from around the world.

Hours of operations are 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. EST, seven days a week. Reach them at 315-519-2640 to learn more.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/maple-syrup/mohawk-valley-trading-co/prweb10545316.htm

30th Annual Maine Maple Sunday, March 24

Augusta, ME — The 30th Annual Maine Maple Sunday will be celebrated statewide on March 24, when participating sugar shacks invite the public to see the syrup-making process and taste samples of maple syrup, sugar, candy and other foods.

In their effort to support and promote sustainable agriculture, local, small and family owned farms and other local food sources, The Mohawk Valley Trading Company encourages families and people of all ages to attend and participate in maple festivities; they are fun, historical and educational outdoor events.

“Maple syrup festivities are fun, historical and educational outdoor events that are always a good time for families and people of all ages,” said Mary Ross of the Mohawk Valley Trading Company where their maple syrup is made primarily from sugar maple sap.

Sugar maple sap is preferred for maple syrup production because it has an average sugar content of two percent. Sap from other maple species is usually lower in sugar content, and about twice as much is needed to produce the same amount of finished syrup.

“Maple syrup and sugar have played an important role in our nation’s history.” Ross continued, “After the passage of the 1764 Sugar Act, which imposed high tariffs on imported sugar, maple sugar became even more popular. Before he became president, Thomas Jefferson liked the idea that maple sugar could be produced by citizens of the new nation and sever it’s dependence on sugar grown on plantations in the British Caribbean. And at the end of a visit to Vermont, in a speech he gave in Bennington, Jefferson said, “Attention to our sugar orchards is essentially necessary to secure the independence of our country.”

Vermont is the largest producer of maple syrup in the US and last year Maine tied with New York (the No. 2 syrup-producing state) by producing 360,000 gallons.

As a prelude to the event, Gov. Paul LePage was joined by Agriculture Commissioner Walt Whitcomb, maple syrup producers and legislators for the annual Blaine House ceremonial maple tree tapping on the lawn of the governor’s mansion.

About Maple Syrup

Next to honey, maple syrup is the most popular natural sweetener in North America and its production predates European colonization. Early Native American societies in Canada and the northeastern United States were distilling maple tree sap making maple syrup and sugar before those geographic boundaries existed. Maple sugar is made from the controlled crystallization of maple syrup and takes several forms. There is no written record of the first syrup production but several native legends persist. Many tribes celebrated the short maple sap collection season with specific rituals.

The Native Americans collected maple sap from v-shaped notches carved into maple trees. The sap was diverted into birch bark buckets using bark or reeds. It was concentrated by placing hot stones into the buckets or by freezing the sap and removing the ice, which is composed only of water.

When Europeans reached northeastern America they adapted native techniques to make their own maple syrup. The v-shaped notches were replaced with auger-drilled holes. This practice is less damaging to the trees. Bark buckets were replaced with seamless wooden buckets carved from lumber rounds. The method of sap concentration also changed from passive to active. Large amounts of sap were collected and brought to a single area where it was boiled over fires in round cauldrons until reduced to the desired consistency. ‘Sugar shacks’ were built expressly for the purpose of sap boiling. Draft animals were often used to haul fire wood and large containers of sap for sugaring. Maple syrup was an important food additive in early America because imported cane sugar was not yet available.

In the mid-1800’s syrup production changed again. Round cauldrons were replaced by flat pans in order to increase surface area and therefore allow for faster evaporation. Over the next 60 year several variations on this design were patented. Draft animals were replaced by tractors and heating methods expanded to include propane, oil and natural gas as well as wood.

French toast, waffles, pancakes or oatmeal are regularly served with maple syrup and it is used as a sweetener or flavoring ingredient in baked goods and ice cream.

The Mohawk Valley Trading Company offers the highest quality unprocessed natural products they can produce namely; maple syrup, raw honey, beeswax candles, natural skin care products and handmade soap. In addition, they offer natural stone, tea and spices from around the world.

Hours of operations are 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. EST, seven days a week. Reach them at (315)-519-2640 to learn more.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/maple-syrup/mohawk-valley-trading-co/prweb10504935.htm

Michigan Maple Syrup Association to Hold Michigan Maple Syrup Weekends

Michigan — The Michigan Maple Syrup Association will hold the first of three Michigan Maple Syrup Weekends beginning March 16-17. Three separate weekends will accommodate the distinct areas of the state and the weather that affects them: the area south of US 10 will be held the weekend of March 16-17, north of US 10 will be March 23-24, and the Upper Peninsula will be the weekend of March 30-31.

In their effort to support and promote sustainable agriculture, local, small and family owned farms and other local food sources, The Mohawk Valley Trading Company encourages families and people of all ages to attend and participate in maple festivities.

“Maple syrup festivities are fun, historical and educational outdoor events that are always a good time for families and people of all ages,” said Mary Ross of the Mohawk Valley Trading Company where their maple syrup is made primarily from sugar maple sap. Sugar maple sap is preferred for maple syrup production because it has an average sugar content of two percent. Sap from other maple species is usually lower in sugar content, and about twice as much is needed to produce the same amount of finished syrup.

“Maple syrup and sugar have played an important role in our nation’s history.” Ross continued, “After the passage of the 1764 Sugar Act, which imposed high tariffs on imported sugar, maple sugar became even more popular. Before he became president, Thomas Jefferson liked the idea that maple sugar could be produced by citizens of the new nation and sever it’s dependence on sugar grown on plantations in the British Caribbean. And at the end of a visit to Vermont, in a speech he gave in Bennington, Jefferson said, “Attention to our sugar orchards is essentially necessary to secure the independence of our country.”

Last year, Michigan syrup production was down about 50% due to warm weather, however this year, Mother Nature seems to be cooperating.

“Last year, we started in mid-February, which is really early,” said Larry Haigh, president of the Michigan Maple Syrup Association and owner of Haigh’s Maple Syrup and Supplies in Bellevue, Michigan. Haigh’s Maple Syrup farm is one of many producers that will participate in the festivities.

“You kind of depend on mother nature to take what we can get,” Haigh said. “So, when we get these warms days, we’ll get some good runs, and then at night, the snow and the cool ground will help cool it faster, so we’re kind of hoping we’ll get a more traditional season.”

Michigan rank 7th nationally in maple syrup production and Governor Snyder has declared March Michigan Maple Syrup Month. However, according to Haigh, the state has a lot of untapped potential.

“Michigan actually has twice as many trees as Vermont,” Haigh said. “We’re tapping like .02 percent of the trees that could be tapped that are maple.”

A brochure with participating sugarhouses will be available at the Chamber of Commerce, local welcome centers and other public places.

About Maple Syrup

Next to honey, maple syrup is the most popular natural sweetener in North America and its production predates European colonization. Early Native American societies in Canada and the northeastern United States were distilling maple tree sap making maple syrup and sugar before those geographic boundaries existed. Maple sugar is made from the controlled crystallization of maple syrup and takes several forms.There is no written record of the first syrup production but several native legends persist. Many tribes celebrated the short maple sap collection season with specific rituals.

The Native Americans collected maple sap from v-shaped notches carved into maple trees. The sap was diverted into birch bark buckets using bark or reeds. It was concentrated by placing hot stones into the buckets or by freezing the sap and removing the ice, which is composed only of water.

When Europeans reached northeastern America they adapted native techniques to make their own maple syrup. The v-shaped notches were replaced with auger-drilled holes. This practice is less damaging to the trees. Bark buckets were replaced with seamless wooden buckets carved from lumber rounds. The method of sap concentration also changed from passive to active. Large amounts of sap were collected and brought to a single area where it was boiled over fires in round cauldrons until reduced to the desired consistency. ‘Sugar shacks’ were built expressly for the purpose of sap boiling. Draft animals were often used to haul fire wood and large containers of sap for sugaring. Maple syrup was an important food additive in early America because imported cane sugar was not yet available.

In the mid-1800’s syrup production changed again. Round cauldrons were replaced by flat pans in order to increase surface area and therefore allow for faster evaporation. Over the next 60 year several variations on this design were patented. Draft animals were replaced by tractors and heating methods expanded to include propane, oil and natural gas as well as wood.

The Mohawk Valley Trading Company offers the highest quality unprocessed natural products they can produce namely; maple syrup, raw honey, beeswax candles, natural skin care products and handmade soap.

Hours of operations are 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. EST, seven days a week. Reach them at (315)-519-2640 to learn more.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/maple-syrup/mohawk-valley-trading-co/prweb10528414.htm

Getting Kids Outdoors to Hold Maple Syrup Workshop

Harbor Springs, Michigan — The Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians is partnering with Getting Kids Outdoors Emmet County to hold a maple syrup workshop on Sunday, March 17 from 1-3 p.m.

In their effort to support and promote sustainable agriculture, local, small and family owned farms and other local food sources, The Mohawk Valley Trading Company encourages families and people of all ages to attend and participate in this fun and educational outdoor event.

“Maple syrup festivities are fun, historical and educational outdoor events that are always a good time for families and people of all ages,” said Mary Ross of the Mohawk Valley Trading Company where their maple syrup is made primarily from sugar maple sap.

Sugar maple sap is preferred for maple syrup production because it has an average sugar content of two percent. Sap from other maple species is usually lower in sugar content, and about twice as much is needed to produce the same amount of finished syrup.

“Maple syrup and sugar have played an important role in our nation’s history.” Ross continued, “After the passage of the 1764 Sugar Act, which imposed high tariffs on imported sugar, maple sugar became even more popular. Before he became president, Thomas Jefferson liked the idea that maple sugar could be produced by citizens of the new nation and sever it’s dependence on sugar grown on plantations in the British Caribbean. And at the end of a visit to Vermont, in a speech he gave in Bennington, Jefferson said, “Attention to our sugar orchards is essentially necessary to secure the independence of our country.”

Doug Craven a tribal member will head the casual tour and discuss why the month of the sugar moon was so important to the Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa’s culture and the difference between traditional native maple sugaring and modern methods.

About Maple Syrup

Next to honey, maple syrup is the most popular natural sweetener in North America and its production predates European colonization. Early Native American societies in Canada and the northeastern United States were distilling maple tree sap making maple syrup and sugar before those geographic boundaries existed. Maple sugar is made from the controlled crystallization of maple syrup and takes several forms.There is no written record of the first syrup production but several native legends persist. Many tribes celebrated the short maple sap collection season with specific rituals.

The Native Americans collected maple sap from v-shaped notches carved into maple trees. The sap was diverted into birch bark buckets using bark or reeds. It was concentrated by placing hot stones into the buckets or by freezing the sap and removing the ice, which is composed only of water.

When Europeans reached northeastern America they adapted native techniques to make their own maple syrup. The v-shaped notches were replaced with auger-drilled holes. This practice is less damaging to the trees. Bark buckets were replaced with seamless wooden buckets carved from lumber rounds. The method of sap concentration also changed from passive to active. Large amounts of sap were collected and brought to a single area where it was boiled over fires in round cauldrons until reduced to the desired consistency. ‘Sugar shacks’ were built expressly for the purpose of sap boiling. Draft animals were often used to haul fire wood and large containers of sap for sugaring. Maple syrup was an important food additive in early America because imported cane sugar was not yet available.

In the mid-1800’s syrup production changed again. Round cauldrons were replaced by flat pans in order to increase surface area and therefore allow for faster evaporation. Over the next 60 year several variations on this design were patented. Draft animals were replaced by tractors and heating methods expanded to include propane, oil and natural gas as well as wood.

The 1970’s represent another period of major changes in maple syrup production. Plastic tubing running directly from trees to the sugaring location eliminated the need for energy and time intensive sap collection. Reverse osmosis and pre-heating made syrup production more efficient. Recent advances have been made in sugarbush (maple trees used primarily for syrup production) management, filtration and storage.

There are two well known systems maple syrup grading in use today. One system is used in Canada (where 80% of the world’s maple syrup is produced) and another system is used in the United States of America. Both systems are based on color and translucence with relate to the flavor of the syrup. Different grades are produced by the same trees over the length of the season.

French toast, waffles, pancakes or oatmeal are regularly served with maple syrup and it is used as a sweetener or flavoring ingredient in baked goods and ice cream. Since maple syrup recipes usually do not specify any particular grade to use, take into consideration that darker colored syrups will produce dishes that a have a pronounced maple flavor.

The Mohawk Valley Trading Company offers the highest quality unprocessed natural products they can produce namely; maple syrup, raw honey, beeswax candles, natural skin care products and handmade soap. In addition, they offer natural stone, tea and spices from around the world such, Demerara sugar, Madagascar vanilla beans, Vietnamese cinnamon, vanilla beans, ground vanilla beans, vanilla extract, allspice, cloves, ginger, nutmeg and mace.

Hours of operations are 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. EST, seven days a week. Reach them at (315)-519-2640 to learn more.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/maple-syrup/mohawk-valley-trading-co/prweb10525926.htm

New York State Maple Syrup Season 2013 Showing Promise of Excellence

New York — Maple syrup producers in New York State are keeping their fingers crossed in hopes that the weather will continue to cooperate this year to make up for last year’s dismal season.

“Last year was a disaster with temperatures in the 70s and 80s this time in March,” said Chris Schoff, owner of Schoff’s Sugar Shack in Victor where he has about 1000 taps. “March 12th was the last syrup that we made last year.”

Mr. Schoff expects to make around 200 gallons of syrup each year and if the weather continues to cooperate this year, he hopes to make more.

“I’ll be producing weeks after I did last year, absolutely,” said Schoff.

“The last few weeks we’ve had a lot of cold nights and a few warm days so we made a little bit of syrup,” said Gregory Keyes, owner of Trout Brook Sugarhouse in Honeoye Falls “but we doubled our production in the last days, the sap began to run.”

“So far so good,” said Mary Ross of the Mohawk Valley Trading Company where their maple syrup is made primarily from sugar maple sap. Sugar maple sap is preferred for maple syrup production because it has an average sugar content of two percent. Sap from other maple species is usually lower in sugar content, and about twice as much is needed to produce the same amount of finished syrup. “but it aint over yet.” Ross continued “We are keeping their fingers crossed in hopes that the weather will continue to cooperate this year to make up for last year’s dismal season.”

“Maple syrup and sugar have played an important role in our nation’s history.” Ross said “After the passage of the 1764 Sugar Act, which imposed high tariffs on imported sugar, maple sugar became even more popular. Before he became president, Thomas Jefferson liked the idea that maple sugar could be produced by citizens of the new nation and sever it’s dependence on sugar grown on plantations in the British Caribbean. And at the end of a visit to Vermont, in a speech he gave in Bennington, Jefferson said, “Attention to our sugar orchards is essentially necessary to secure the independence of our country.”

About Maple Syrup

Next to honey, maple syrup is the most popular natural sweetener in North America and its production predates European colonization. Early Native American societies in Canada and the northeastern United States were distilling maple tree sap making maple syrup and sugar before those geographic boundaries existed. Maple sugar is made from the controlled crystallization of maple syrup and takes several forms.There is no written record of the first syrup production but several native legends persist. Many tribes celebrated the short maple sap collection season with specific rituals.

The Native Americans collected maple sap from v-shaped notches carved into maple trees. The sap was diverted into birch bark buckets using bark or reeds. It was concentrated by placing hot stones into the buckets or by freezing the sap and removing the ice, which is composed only of water.

When Europeans reached northeastern America they adapted native techniques to make their own maple syrup. The v-shaped notches were replaced with auger-drilled holes. This practice is less damaging to the trees. Bark buckets were replaced with seamless wooden buckets carved from lumber rounds. The method of sap concentration also changed from passive to active. Large amounts of sap were collected and brought to a single area where it was boiled over fires in round cauldrons until reduced to the desired consistency. ‘Sugar shacks’ were built expressly for the purpose of sap boiling. Draft animals were often used to haul fire wood and large containers of sap for sugaring. Maple syrup was an important food additive in early America because imported cane sugar was not yet available.

In the mid-1800’s syrup production changed again. Round cauldrons were replaced by flat pans in order to increase surface area and therefore allow for faster evaporation. Over the next 60 year several variations on this design were patented. Draft animals were replaced by tractors and heating methods expanded to include propane, oil and natural gas as well as wood.

The Mohawk Valley Trading Company offers the highest quality unprocessed natural products they can produce namely; maple syrup, raw honey, beeswax candles, natural skin care products and handmade soap. In addition, they offer natural stone, tea and spices from around the world such, Demerara sugar, Madagascar vanilla beans, Vietnamese cinnamon, vanilla beans, ground vanilla beans, vanilla extract, allspice, cloves, ginger, nutmeg and mace.

Hours of operations are 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. EST, seven days a week. Reach them at (315)-519-2640 to learn more.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/maple-syrup/mohawk-valley-trading-co/prweb10519272.htm

New York State Upper Hudson Maple Producers Association to Host Open House Sugarhouse Weekends

Salem, New York — Members of The Upper Hudson Maple Producers Association will open the doors of their sugarhouses to the public the weekends of March 16 and 17 and March 23 and 24 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day.There will be free tours, demonstrations on how maple syrup is made, and some of the sugarhouses will be serving pancake breakfasts.

In their effort to support and promote sustainable agriculture, local, small and family owned farms and other local food sources, The Mohawk Valley Trading Company encourages families and people of all ages to attend and participate in maple festivities.

“Maple syrup festivities are fun, inexpensive, historical and educational outdoor events that are always a good time for families and people of all ages,” said Mary Ross of the Mohawk Valley Trading Company where their maple syrup is made primarily from sugar maple sap.

Sugar maple sap is preferred for maple syrup production because it has an average sugar content of two percent. Sap from other maple species is usually lower in sugar content, and about twice as much is needed to produce the same amount of finished syrup.

“Maple syrup and sugar have played an important role in our nation’s history.” Ross continued, “After the passage of the 1764 Sugar Act, which imposed high tariffs on imported sugar, maple sugar became even more popular. Before he became president, Thomas Jefferson liked the idea that maple sugar could be produced by citizens of the new nation and sever it’s dependence on sugar grown on plantations in the British Caribbean. And at the end of a visit to Vermont, in a speech he gave in Bennington, Jefferson said, “Attention to our sugar orchards is essentially necessary to secure the independence of our country.”

“We’re inviting area families to come and experience first-hand the sights, smells and sounds of maple sugarmaking,” said David Campbell, a Salem producer and president of the Upper Hudson Maple Producers Association. “The event has been so successful we have expanded it to two weekends, giving folks more opportunity to come visit sugarhouses.”

Participating sugarhouses are located throughout the counties of Saratoga, Washington, Warren, Rensselaer, Fulton and Montgomery.

To kick off the event, a tree-tapping ceremony is scheduled at Rathbun’s Maple Sugar House in Whitehall, Friday, March 15; at 12:30 p.m. State Agriculture Commissioner Darrel Aubertine is expected to attend the event along with local officials.

The upper Hudson River region is one of the major syrup-producing areas in New York State.

About Maple Syrup

Next to honey, maple syrup is the most popular natural sweetener in North America and its production predates European colonization. Early Native American societies in Canada and the northeastern United States were distilling maple tree sap making maple syrup and sugar before those geographic boundaries existed. Maple sugar is made from the controlled crystallization of maple syrup and takes several forms.There is no written record of the first syrup production but several native legends persist. Many tribes celebrated the short maple sap collection season with specific rituals.

The Native Americans collected maple sap from v-shaped notches carved into maple trees. The sap was diverted into birch bark buckets using bark or reeds. It was concentrated by placing hot stones into the buckets or by freezing the sap and removing the ice, which is composed only of water.

When Europeans reached northeastern America they adapted native techniques to make their own maple syrup. The v-shaped notches were replaced with auger-drilled holes. This practice is less damaging to the trees. Bark buckets were replaced with seamless wooden buckets carved from lumber rounds. The method of sap concentration also changed from passive to active. Large amounts of sap were collected and brought to a single area where it was boiled over fires in round cauldrons until reduced to the desired consistency. ‘Sugar shacks’ were built expressly for the purpose of sap boiling. Draft animals were often used to haul fire wood and large containers of sap for sugaring. Maple syrup was an important food additive in early America because imported cane sugar was not yet available.

In the mid-1800’s syrup production changed again. Round cauldrons were replaced by flat pans in order to increase surface area and therefore allow for faster evaporation. Over the next 60 year several variations on this design were patented. Draft animals were replaced by tractors and heating methods expanded to include propane, oil and natural gas as well as wood.

French toast, waffles, pancakes or oatmeal are regularly served with maple syrup and it is used as a sweetener or flavoring ingredient in baked goods and ice cream. Since maple syrup recipes usually do not specify any particular grade to use, take into consideration that darker colored syrups will produce dishes that a have a pronounced maple flavor.

The Mohawk Valley Trading Company offers the highest quality unprocessed natural products they can produce namely; maple syrup, raw honey, beeswax candles, natural skin care products and handmade soap. In addition, they offer natural stone, tea and spices from around the world.

Hours of operations are 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. EST, seven days a week. Reach them at (315)-519-2640 to learn more.

For the original version on PRWeb visit:  www.prweb.com/releases/maple-syrup/mohawk-valley-trading-co/prweb10518791.htm